Several Caribbean countries under drought watches or warnings

Water Source Exhaustion, Drought Land, Water Security

BRIDGETOWN, Barbados, Monday February 15, 2016 – A number of Caribbean countries have been placed under immediate drought warnings or watches, according to the Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency (CDEMA).

The Barbados-based agency said that last year was the driest on record for the Eastern Caribbean and some other areas and that the 2015-16 drought situation is similar to the major drought of 2009-10.

“The drought situation remains a major concern for many countries due to the below-normal rainfall recorded during the previous dry and wet seasons, which resulted in a number of countries experiencing water shortages in 2015,” CDEMA said in a statement.

Drought alerts have been issued by the Caribbean Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology (CIMH) for several countries up to March 2016, it added.

Drought warnings have been issued for Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Dominica, northern Guyana, St Kitts and Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent and the Grenadines, Trinidad and Tobago and northern Suriname.

A drought watch has also been issued for Grenada, while Haiti east-and southward has been noted for drought concern.

The drought outlook for the short-term, until March 2016, may result in a rise or persistent drought situation in Haiti east-and southward and especially in Antigua, Barbados and the Leeward islands, CDEMA said.

“The longer term outlook — beyond March 2016 – will see a drier early part of the year in the Lesser Antilles due to a peak in the strength of El Niño.

“This may lead to drought concerns towards the end of the Caribbean dry season that is May 31, 2016. A drought watch is therefore issued for the Bahamas and southwest Belize during this period,” the agency said.

In the coming months, with El Niño subsiding around the start of the Hurricane Season, the drought impacts will worsen until May and ease afterwards, it predicted.

“La Niña, the opposite of El Niño, might take over later in the year, resulting in higher flood risk. The national water management authorities continue to lead at the national level and the Caribbean Water and Wastewater Association (CWWA) is on alert and planning for future actions,” the agency said.

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  • waterman14

    The islands listed in this newspaper article can start solving their water problems by exploiting the freshwater lens contained in the aquifers running under their respective islands. Northern Guyana should not even be on this list. The meaning of the word “Guyana” is “The Land of Many Waters”. The folks in charge of Guyana’s water supply (the Guyana Water Inc.) are totally incompetent to begin with anyway. And they are too proud to take technical advice. The Barbados Water Authority never took my technical advice I offered on developing their freshwater lens weeks ago, and now find themselves in a much deeper hole. It is hilarious to note here that the Suriname government was offering to sell water to the Barbados government just a few weeks ago. Now northern Suriname is in the same predicament as Barbados regarding water supply shortage. Incidentally, the water that Suriname was going to sell to Barbados is water running in aquifers under the ground from Guyana to Suriname. So, in actuality, Suriname was planning to sell Guyana’s water to Suriname at the rate of USD $55 million per year. In conclusion, I hereby extend an invitation to Antigua & Barbuda, Dominica, St. Kitts & Nevis, St. Vincent & Grenadines, Trinidad & Tobago and Northern Suriname to contact me for FREE technical advice in helping their respective governments to deal with their drought watches or warnings presently in effect. I have been in the water sector business for over 35 years and I’m the best in the world at my specialty. http://www.njgeology.org

  • waterman14

    The islands listed in this newspaper article can start solving their water problems by exploiting the freshwater lens contained in the aquifers running under their respective islands. Northern Guyana should not even be on this list. The meaning of the word “Guyana” is “The Land of Many Waters”. The folks in charge of Guyana’s water supply (the Guyana Water Inc.) are totally incompetent to begin with anyway. And they are too proud to take free technical advice. The Barbados Water Authority never took the free technical advice I offered them to develop their freshwater lens weeks ago, and now find themselves in a much deeper hole. It is hilarious to note here that the Suriname government was offering to sell water to the Barbados government just a few weeks ago. Now northern Suriname is in the same predicament as Barbados regarding water supply shortage. Incidentally, the water that Suriname was going to sell to Barbados is water running in aquifers under the ground from Guyana to Suriname. So, in actuality, Suriname was planning to sell Guyana’s water to Suriname at the rate of USD $55 million per year. In conclusion, I hereby extend an invitation to Antigua & Barbuda, Dominica, St. Kitts & Nevis, St. Vincent & Grenadines, Trinidad & Tobago and Northern Suriname to contact me for FREE technical advice in helping their respective governments to deal with their drought watches or warnings presently in effect. I have been in the water sector business for over 35 years and I’m the best in the world at my specialty. http://www.njgeology.org