Trinidad-Born Union Leader Begins Serving Jail Term

NEW YORK, N.Y., Apr 25, 2006 – Trinidad-born leader of the Transit Workers Local 100 union, Roger Toussaint, walked over the historic Brooklyn Bridge yesterday into his lower Manhattan jail cell, giving life to a December tabloid image that had shown the labor leader behind hypothetical bars.


Toussaint checked into “The Tombs” to begin serving his 10-day jail sentence that was handed down earlier this month by African-American Judge Theodore Jones of the Brooklyn Supreme Court. But the union leader remained defiant even as he geared up for the jail time, saying he views the sentence as the fight for workers’ rights.


“Even if the judge had given me 30 years, I would gladly walk through those prisons and gladly stand up for the dignity of working men and women. So brothers and sisters, let’s begin our march,” he told supporters earlier in the day at a rally in Brooklyn. “Never on my watch will they ever, ever bow and cower transit workers, ever.”

Toussaint, along with Reverend Al Sharpton and an entourage of labor leaders and activists, attended the rally before walking over the Brooklyn Bridge into Lower Manhattan to the jail known as “The Tombs,” where he turned himself in around 7 p.m. yesterday.

His supporters vow to hold vigils in protest of his sentence throughout the 10 days. (Hardbeatnews.com),


Hardbeatnews, NEW YORK, N.Y., Tues. Apr. 25, 2006: Trinidad-born leader of the Transit Workers Local 100 union, Roger Toussaint, walked over the historic Brooklyn Bridge yesterday into his lower Manhattan jail cell, giving life to a December tabloid image that had shown the labor leader behind hypothetical bars.


Toussaint checked into “The Tombs” to begin serving his 10-day jail sentence that was handed down earlier this month by African-American Judge Theodore Jones of the Brooklyn Supreme Court. But the union leader remained defiant even as he geared up for the jail time, saying he views the sentence as the fight for workers’ rights.

“Even if the judge had given me 30 years, I would gladly walk through those prisons and gladly stand up for the dignity of working men and women. So brothers and sisters, let’s begin our march,” he told supporters earlier in the day at a rally in Brooklyn. “Never on my watch will they ever, ever bow and cower transit workers, ever.”

Toussaint, along with Reverend Al Sharpton and an entourage of labor leaders and activists, attended the rally before walking over the Brooklyn Bridge into Lower Manhattan to the jail known as “The Tombs,” where he turned himself in around 7 p.m. yesterday.

His supporters vow to hold vigils in protest of his sentence throughout the 10 days. (Hardbeatnews.com)